Zuckerberg apologizes for data scandal in full-page ads

Facebook Cambridge Analytica

Facebook Cambridge Analytica

Facebook co-founder and chief executive officer Mark Zuckerberg apologized Sunday in full-page ads in nine major British and USA newspapers for the massive "breach of trust" at the social media giant that revealed personal information of millions of Facebook users.

"This was a breach of trust, and I'm sorry we didn't do more at the time", Zuckerberg said, reiterating an apology first made last week in U.S. television interviews.

The ads, which appeared in the New York Times, Washington Post, Wall Street Journal, The Observer, The Sunday Times, Mail on Sunday, Sunday Mirror, Sunday Express and Sunday Telegraph, were led off with a declaration of: "We have a responsibility to protect your information".

Facebook needs to have more control over third-party apps that request information from it, says the head of Internet New Zealand.

Limits on the amount of data that apps get when you sign in using Facebook. "We expect there are others", he wrote.

There was no mention of the British firm accused of using the data, Cambridge Analytica, which worked on US President Donald Trump's 2016 campaign.

"You may have heard about a quiz app built by a university researcher that leaked Facebook data of millions of people in 2014", Zuckerberg said in the signed ads, referring to the data analytics firm of accused of misusing Facebook data during the 2016 United States election.

The letter does not significantly differ from a statement published on Mr Zuckerberg's Facebook page, shortly before he said he was "open" to testifying before Congress in the US.

The billionaire entrepreneur has been making the rounds in the media world, discussing the company's relationship with Cambridge Analytica, a controversial firm which harvested personal data from almost 50 million Facebook profiles in an attempt to influence the 2016 presidential election.

Facebook founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg is officially on a global apology tour.

The world's 4 richest person should not be untouchable and the more than 50m Facebook users would likely agree that the punishment for top execs at the social network company, that has become all too anti-social, should be more than the loss in share value in the early part of the week.

"I'm not sure we shouldn't be regulated", he told CNN. "Bugs can cause damage, but bugs are created by people, and can be fixed by people", he said.

A social media campaign to #DeleteFacebook has continued to attract support.

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