China plans to replace streetlights with ‘artificial moon’ by 2020

Queqiao, the relay satellite for the Chang'e-4 lunar mission entered the planned halo orbit around the second Lagrangian point of the Earth Moon system about 65,000 km from the Moon on 14 June 2018 at 03:06 UTC (11:0

Queqiao, the relay satellite for the Chang'e-4 lunar mission entered the planned halo orbit around the second Lagrangian point of the Earth Moon system about 65,000 km from the Moon on 14 June 2018 at 03:06 UTC (11:0

The artificial moon might replace some street lights in the urban area, thus conserving energy. The Norwegian town of Rjukan installed three large computer-controlled mirrors to track and reflect sunlight in 2013; in the 1990s, Russian astronomers succeeded in launching a satellite into space to deflect sunlight back to Earth, but a second attempt in 1999 failed.

Based on a report from the People's Daily in China, inspiration came from an unnamed French artist who wanted to hang a necklace made of mirrors up above Earth to reflect sunshine on Paris at night.

This info all comes via Wu Chunfeng, the chairman of Chengdu Aerospace Science and Technology Microelectronics System Research Institute Co., who spoke last week at an innovation and entrepreneurship conference in Chengdu.

The freaky plan, which would give a "dust-like glow" for the south-western city of 14 million, was revealed in the People's Daily newspaper.

A Chinese city is exhausted of relying on electricity and the regular old moon to provide lights around town at night.

The company says it will be launching an "illumination satellite" in less than two years, this created to light up the night sky with artificial light 8 times greater than the actual Moon.

Artificial light also throws animals off their natural day-night rhythms.

China is planning to launch its own "artificial moon" by 2020 to replace streetlamps and lower electricity costs in urban areas, state media reported on Friday.

The testing of the illumination satellite started years ago, and now the technology has finally matured, explained Wu.

It remains to be seen whether Chengdu's artificial moon will prove any more successful.

This isn't the first time researchers have tried to illuminate the skies with artificial rays.

Some local residents have reportedly expressed concern that the project could disturb the lives of various wildlife as well as those practicing astronomical observation. And, by 2020, it may even become reality.

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